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FB-BannerOnline tools are available that will let you control your kids’ access to adult material and help protect them from Internet predators. No option is going to guarantee that they’ll be kept away from 100% of the risks on the Internet. So it’s important to be aware of your kids’ computer activities and educate them about online risks.

Many Internet service providers (ISPs) provide parent-control options to block certain material from coming into a computer. You can also get software that helps block access to certain sites based on a “bad site” list that your ISP creates. Filtering programs can block sites from coming in and restrict personal information from being sent online. Other programs can monitor and track online activity. Also, make sure your kids create a screen name to protect their real identity. 

For more information on the different options in protecting your children, AND YOURSELF, click here.

Be safe and be blessed!

 

Screen20A federal law, the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), was created to help protect kids online. It’s designed to keep anyone from obtaining a child’s personal information without a parent knowing about it and agreeing to it first.

COPPA requires websites to explain their privacy policies on the site and get parental consent before collecting or using a child’s personal information, such as a name, address, phone number, or Social Security number. The law also prohibits a site from requiring a child to provide more personal information than necessary to play a game or participate in a contest.

But even with this law, your kids’ best online protection is you. By talking to them about potential online dangers and monitoring their computer use, you’ll help them surf the Internet safely.

One thing important to remember…  COPPA is a Federal Law.  While the internet is world wide, not all users and websites will follow COPPA.

For more information on COPPA, CLICK HERE.

Be safe and be blessed!

 It is essential to take an active role in protecting your kids from Internet predators and sexually explicit materials online. To do that:

  • Become computer literate and learn how to block objectionable material.Screen68b
  • Keep the computer in a common area, not in individual bedrooms, where you can watch and monitor its use.
  • Share an email account with your child so you can monitor messages.
  • Bookmark kids’ favorite sites for easy access.
  • Spend time online together to teach your kids appropriate online behavior.
  • Forbid your child from entering private chat rooms; block them with safety features provided by your Internet service provider or with special filtering software. Be aware that posting messages to chat rooms reveals a user’s email address to others.
  • Monitor your credit card and phone bills for unfamiliar account charges.
  • Find out what, if any, online protection is offered by your child’s school, after-school center, friends’ homes, or anyplace where kids could use a computer without your supervision.
  • Take your child seriously if he or she reports an uncomfortable online exchange.
  • Forward copies of obscene or threatening messages you or your kids get to your Internet service provider.
  • Call the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children at (800) 843-5678 if you’re aware of the transmission, use, or viewing of child pornography online. Contact your local law enforcement agency or the FBI if your child has received child pornography via the Internet.

For more information on how to protect yourself and your children, CONTACT THE CMD GROUP and take a few minutes to WATCH OUR VIDEO on Knowledge, Wisdom and the Internet.

Be safe and be blessed!

I grew up in an age that “bullying” was a part of what made you tough.  You took it, you brushed it off, you moved on.cyberbullying

That does not necessarily apply in this day and age.  Is it the anonymity of the electronics age we live in?  You can say something without having to look the person you are “talking to” in the eye?  Or, is it the degradation of our society in which what was unacceptable years ago is now the norm?  Or..  Is it both?

No matter why, it is real.  It is happening and we (parents) need to be aware.  Not only do parents need to be aware, but teens need to let their parents know when it is happening.  Yeah, yeah, that’s not cool.  Well, neither is what this ‘Cyber-Bullying’ leads to.  Here are some statistics for you to consider:

Despite the potential damage of cyber bullying, it is alarmingly common among adolescents and teens. According to Cyber bullying statistics from the i-SAFE foundation:

    • Over half of adolescents and teens have been bullied online, and about the same number have engaged in cyber bullying.
    • More than 1 in 3 young people have experienced cyberthreats online.
    • Over 25 percent of adolescents and teens have been bullied repeatedly through their cell phones or the Internet.
    • Well over half of young people do not tell their parents when cyber bullying occurs.

Parents, this needs to be addressed with your teen, and pre-teen.  Take a few moments and discuss with them what is and what is not acceptable.

Be safe and be blessed!

Posted by: In: Safety Tips, Video Work 17 Dec 2012 0 comments

The CMD Group offers a very informative instruction to teens and parents on how to protect themselves on the Internet and social networks such as Facebook. This video shares a story of a young lady named Amanda and how she was harassed online. She posted her story on the internet for all to see before taking her own life.

Cyber Bullying is very real. We need to protect our teens and youth. It is not difficult to protect yourself and to protect your children. Let The CMD Group help!

We look forward to opportunities to speak at churches, youth groups, schools and any group setting.

Be safe and be blessed!

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HA3OWy69tm8

I found a very good article on credit card fraud, thought I would share some stats that I hope will drive home how important it is to protect ourselves on the Internet.

‘The ease of sharing information can lead some people to reveal too much. The danger of over-revelation leads beyond mere social faux pas. More than half of adults who use online social networks post information that puts them at risk of cybercrime, including fraudulent credit card use, says a recent survey by Consumer Reports.

According to the 2012 Javelin Strategy and Research’s independent analysis of identity fraud report, in 2011, more than 11.6 million adults were victims of fraud, up 11% from the previous year. The report also found that users of social media sites such as LinkedIn, Google +, Facebook and Twitter have the highest instances of identity theft. And though the study notes that there is no proof of direct causation, it also states that more people are sharing too much sensitive information via these sites that can be used to confirm identity.’

Do not post your birthday, Social Security Number or address online.  This is all information that can be used to steal your identity and put you and your family at risk.

Be safe and be blessed.